Monday, January 23, 2017

TUE 1-24




RECENTLY ADDED OPTIONS

Henry "Box" Brown
Henry "Box" Brown was born, enslaved, on a Virginia plantation in 1815. After his family was sold, Brown committed himself to escaping from bondage. He had himself shipped in a wooden box from Virginia to Philadelphia, where slavery had been abolished. Brown was subsequently the subject of a popular slave narrative, which he adapted into a stage show. The details of his death are unknown.



Solomon Northrup
Born in July 1808 in Minerva, New York, Solomon Northup grew up a free man, working as a farmer and violinist while having a family. He was lured south and kidnapped in 1841 and enslaved for more than a decade, enduring horribly violent conditions. Northup was freed in 1853 with help from colleagues and friends. His experiences are the subject of the book and film 12 Years a Slave.
John Brown
John Brown was a 19th-century militant abolitionist.  Facing much financial difficulty throughout his life, he was also an ardent abolitionist who worked with the Underground Railroad.  He believed in using violent means to end slavery, and, with the intent of inspiring a slave insurrection, eventually led an unsuccessful raid on the Harper's Ferry federal armory. Brown went to trial and was executed on December 2, 1859.





Susan B. Anthony


Susan B. Anthony was a suffragist, abolitionist, author and speaker who was the president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.  She was arrested for voting illegally.  It wouldn't be until 14 years after Anthony's death—in 1920—that the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, giving all adult women the right to vote, was passed.

Harriet Beecher Stowe
Harriet Beecher Stowe was born on June 14, 1811, in Litchfield, Connecticut. Her father, Lyman Beecher, was a leading Congregationalist minister and the patriarch of a family committed to social justice. Stowe achieved national fame for her anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which fanned the flames of sectionalism before the Civil War. Stowe died in Hartford, Connecticut, on July 1, 1896.







ORIGINAL OPTIONS

William Lloyd Garrison

William Lloyd Garrison was an American journalistic crusader who helped lead the successful abolitionist campaign against slavery in the United States.  He grew up in a poor family, raised by his single mother after his dad walked out.  Known for his criticism of the Constitution as a "pro-slavery" document.








The Grimke Sisters
Abolitionist and feminist Sarah Moore Grimk√© and her sister Angelina were the first women to testify before a state legislature on the issue of blacks' rights.  Growing up on a southern plantation, both she and her younger sister, Angelina, developed anti-slavery sentiments based on the injustices they observed. From an early age, they also resented the limitations imposed on women.








Sojourner Truth


Born in upstate New York circa 1797, Sojourner Truth was the self-given name, from 1843 onward, of Isabella Baumfree, an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. She devoted her life to the abolitionist cause and helped recruiting black troops for the Union Army. Her best-known speech on racial inequalities, "Ain't I a Woman?" was delivered extemporaneously in 1851 at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention.

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War.  Tubman risked her life to lead hundreds to freedom in the North as the most famous "conductor" on the Underground Railroad. She also helped the Union Army during the war, working as a spy among other roles. After the Civil War ended, Tubman dedicated her life to helping impoverished former slaves and the elderly, establishing her own Home for the Aged. In honor of her life and by popular demand via an online poll, in 2016, the U.S. Treasury Department announced that Harriet Tubman will replace Andrew Jackson on the center of a new $20 bill.


Frederick Douglass
Abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass was born into slavery sometime around 1818 in Talbot County, Maryland. He became one of the most famous intellectuals of his time, advising presidents and lecturing to thousands on a range of causes, including women’s rights and Irish home rule. Among Douglass’s writings are several autobiographies eloquently describing his experiences in slavery and his life after the Civil War, including the well-known work Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.  He was the first African-American citizen to hold a high US government rank.

Lucretia Mott

Born Lucretia Coffin on January 3, 1793, in Nantucket, Massachusetts, Lucretia Mott was a women's rights activist, abolitionist, and religious reformer. Mott was strongly opposed to slavery and a supporter of William Lloyd Garrison and his American Anti-Slavery Society. She was dedicated to women's rights, publishing her influential Discourse on Woman and founding Swarthmore College. Mott died in Pennsylvania in 1880.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Born on November 12, 1815, in Johnstown, New York, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an abolitionist and leading figure of the early woman's movement. An eloquent writer, her Declaration of Sentiments was a revolutionary call for women's rights across a variety of spectrums. Stanton was the president of the National Woman Suffrage Association for 20 years and worked closely with Susan B. Anthony.




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